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Collaboration….!

Today is a bit of a dreary day. The first cold day since we got here.

The mountains are covered by fog and it is much colder today.

(The images are from my front step… that’s Latifa’s house, across the lawn.)

Collaboration is a funny thing.  Honestly, sometimes the idea scares me a little, especially if the people you will be collaborating with are people you don’t know very well.  I have to admit that I was a little nervous about the idea of collaborating on this residency with Latifa, who I had not even heard of before.  But it’s going really well.  We’re getting along really well, and I really like her as a person.  We do have separate styles, and skills (of course), but I think our personalities and interests are matching up perfectly.

Kristin tells us that we are probably the only pair of artists to do the Trap/Door residency and actually work together.  I find that a little surprising.

These are some stereogram viewfinders I was making today. We still need to work on refining the images for inside of them.

We’ve got a bunch of things on the go, and a good portion of them are things that either of us may not have explored on our own.  I think that’s one of the perks of collaborating…. your lines of thought are influenced by two people, and so are not as linear as they would be working on your own.  You are exposed to another way of thinking, another way of working, another point of view.  And we’ve been collaborating in different ways… for example, there are things we are working on together (such as researching SIRDs and anaglyphs, and learning Blender, for example), and things we are working on separately (I’m doing a bit of a video thing, and Latifa’s doing a humongous drawing, and will be working with sound if she can get some interviews), but all this will come together in the end, as it is all generally related to our theme, Perception.

We’ve also been talking a lot… about life, art, and other artists.  Latifa also knows a lot about nature and travelling, and I’ve been learning a lot from her.  We’ve also been cooking for each other, taking turns… it’s like having a dinner party every night. I’m really enjoying the experience. :)

Posted on

Collaboration….!

Today is a bit of a dreary day. The first cold day since we got here.

The mountains are covered by fog and it is much colder today.

(The images are from my front step… that’s Latifa’s house, across the lawn.)

Collaboration is a funny thing.  Honestly, sometimes the idea scares me a little, especially if the people you will be collaborating with are people you don’t know very well.  I have to admit that I was a little nervous about the idea of collaborating on this residency with Latifa, who I had not even heard of before.  But it’s going really well.  We’re getting along really well, and I really like her as a person.  We do have separate styles, and skills (of course), but I think our personalities and interests are matching up perfectly.

Kristin tells us that we are probably the only pair of artists to do the Trap/Door residency and actually work together.  I find that a little surprising.

These are some stereogram viewfinders I was making today. We still need to work on refining the images for inside of them.

We’ve got a bunch of things on the go, and a good portion of them are things that either of us may not have explored on our own.  I think that’s one of the perks of collaborating…. your lines of thought are influenced by two people, and so are not as linear as they would be working on your own.  You are exposed to another way of thinking, another way of working, another point of view.  And we’ve been collaborating in different ways… for example, there are things we are working on together (such as researching SIRDs and anaglyphs, and learning Blender, for example), and things we are working on separately (I’m doing a bit of a video thing, and Latifa’s doing a humongous drawing, and will be working with sound if she can get some interviews), but all this will come together in the end, as it is all generally related to our theme, Perception.

We’ve also been talking a lot… about life, art, and other artists.  Latifa also knows a lot about nature and travelling, and I’ve been learning a lot from her.  We’ve also been cooking for each other, taking turns… it’s like having a dinner party every night. I’m really enjoying the experience. :)

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My First SIRD

I am so excited about learning Blender the 3D modelling program. We spent 5 hours yesterday going through the tutorial. There is incredible potential in this vast and still largely incomprehensible world. Like I said to Jen, I wouldn’t have taken the initiative to learn this program, which seems like nonsense at first glance, without the motivation of working with her and being here at the Gushul. So here is my first attempt. I will give you a hint : it is a shape!

So I hope that wasn’t too difficult, unless you have an eye condition :
People with amblyopia (also known as lazy eye) are unable to see the three-dimensional images. Children with poor or dysfunctional eyesight during a critical period in childhood may grow up stereoblind, as their brains are not stimulated by stereo images during the critical period. If such a vision problem is not corrected in the early childhood, the damage becomes permanent and the adult will never be able to see autostereograms.[2][11] It is estimated that some 1% to 5% of the population is affected by amblyopia.[12]

It took me an hour to get the lighting more or less the way I wanted it. Here is the base 3D image :

Posted on

My First SIRD

I am so excited about learning Blender the 3D modelling program. We spent 5 hours yesterday going through the tutorial. There is incredible potential in this vast and still largely incomprehensible world. Like I said to Jen, I wouldn’t have taken the initiative to learn this program, which seems like nonsense at first glance, without the motivation of working with her and being here at the Gushul. So here is my first attempt. I will give you a hint : it is a shape!

So I hope that wasn’t too difficult, unless you have an eye condition :
People with amblyopia (also known as lazy eye) are unable to see the three-dimensional images. Children with poor or dysfunctional eyesight during a critical period in childhood may grow up stereoblind, as their brains are not stimulated by stereo images during the critical period. If such a vision problem is not corrected in the early childhood, the damage becomes permanent and the adult will never be able to see autostereograms.[2][11] It is estimated that some 1% to 5% of the population is affected by amblyopia.[12]

It took me an hour to get the lighting more or less the way I wanted it. Here is the base 3D image :